Wednesday, 2 January 2008

Lardy Cakes made in the bread maker


I made these today as my eldest daughter came across a recipe for them in James Martin’s Desserts book. This recipe takes into account the changes I made this time and what I will change next time. I will be making these again real soon!

7g dried yeast
275ml warm water
450g strong white flour
2 pinches of salt
100g lard
100g butter
200g Sultanas
50g Sugar

Topping
50g lard melted and mixed with 50g butter

Place water, salt, flour, yeast and one third of the lard into the container of your bread maker
Set cycle to dough
When the cycle is complete, turn onto a lightly floured surface and roll out to a rectangle about 5mm thick.
Dot one-third of the remaining lard and one-third of the butter over the surface of the dough.
Sprinkle over one-third of the fruit and sugar.
Fold the dough in three, folding the bottom third up and the top third down.
Give a quarter turn then repeat the process twice more, using up the remaining ingredients.
Grease a 20 x 25cm baking tin
Roll the dough out to fit the prepared tin.
Place into the tin, cover and leave in a warm place for 30 minutes until it rises.
Pre-heat the oven to 220c
Score the top of the dough in a criss-cross pattern.
Bake in the oven for about 30 mins until golden brown
Turn out and brush the top with the melted topping. Turn over and brush the bottom with the remaining topping.
Serve warm

5 comments:

Marie said...

On my list of definite things to try!!! I have that book by James Martin, will be looking it up!

Robson said...

Can you tell me what size tin you used ? A Loaf tin ?

Thanks

Tulip said...

Hi Robson, I used a 20cm x 25cm baking sheet! I would double up the lard, sugar and fruit for even better results!

Robin Scagell said...

Surely in the first line you mean:
'Place water, salt, flour, yeast and one third of the lard into the container of your bread maker'? We followed it to the letter and put one third of the yeast in! Also, several recipes have the mystifying 'folding the bottom third up and the top third down.' We assume this to mean 'fold a third of the dough into the middle, followed by the remaining third' or something like that? Otherwise, which is the bottom third and which the top third? Presumably the aim is simply to distribute the ingredients evenly through the mixture.

Tulip said...

Hi Robin,
You’re right; I did mean half the lard and ALL the yeast. I have edited the recipe so others don’t make the same mistake. As for the folding bit; fold your dough in three, top and bottom make no difference as long as it all folded on top of each other, for the layered effect. How did it turn out, did you enjoy it?